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NOTICE-CLOSED and A Unique Marquee at Heaven Gallery

by Anna Rathman

"Drinkwater's Lincoln: Complain/ Make Sacrifices" by Jeremy Lundquist

"Drinkwater's Lincoln: Complain/ Make Sacrifices" by Jeremy Lundquist

Spudnik Press has taken over Wicker Park’s Heaven Gallery, at least for the time being. Currently on show is A Unique Marquee comprised of work from Spudnik artists, and NOTICE – CLOSED a body of work created by Jeremy Lundquist while an artist in residence at Spudnik. Having the solo and group shows side by side worked out really well. The common denominator of printmaking makes for an overall cohesiveness, and A Unique Marquee helps wet the audience’s appetite for a closer look into a single body of work.

Partial gallery view of "A Unique Marquee." Work seen by Angee Lennard, Meng Yang, and Jeremy Tinder

Partial gallery view of "A Unique Marquee." Work seen by Angee Lennard, Meng Yang, and Jeremy Tinder

The focal point of NOTICE – CLOSED is 21 etchings Lundquist made using a single copper plate. He draws upon tourist culture by collecting signage, pamphlet materials, and his own drawings from Illinois historical sites. By layering these images on one plate, each new image sits on top of the ghost images of past prints. The effect is a sense of loss through the creation of new memories and histories. The tourism theme is carried through a pamphlet for the series that gives a brief description of the attraction and its “points of interest”. NOTICE – CLOSED also includes Adjournment Drawings, which are even more reductive in their imagery and wording than Lundquist’s etchings, and Drinkwater’s Lincoln: Complain/Make Sacrifices, which consists of the words “of course we could all” on the wall. The inclusion of these works support his etchings, by distilling prominent elements to help consider the relationship between text and imagery.

"Irreconcilable Differences" by L. Born

"Irreconcilable Differences" by L. Born

A Unique Marquee features several artists working at Spudnik Press that represent a broad range of style, subject matter, and printmaking processes. While all the works employ new and interesting takes on the classic, and often over looked medium, some resonated more than others did. Meng Yang and Angee Lennard borrow from mid-century advertising and posters to create works that rally support for local industries. Nostalgia and the current economic situation combine to make their work feel simultaneously timeless yet extremely relevant. Also on show are works by L Born, such as Fish Dinner and Irreconcilable Differences. The works are slightly grotesque and read like one-liner jokes, in a hip, fresh way.