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Chicago Art Map: Openings Feb 9-12

Below is a listing from Chicago Art Map of gallery openings taking place this weekend, February 9th – 12th.

-Thursday February, 9th-

Love in the Loop

Temporary – Pop Up Art Loop
23 E. Madison
Loop

Opening reception February 9th, 5-8PM

POP-UP ART LOOP GALLERIES present a Valentine “Love in the Loop” gallery walk & OPENING RECEPTION FOR “SO, HOW LONG DID IT TAKE YOU TO CUT THAT?” with the artwork of Richard Shipps.

Quad Core

What It Is
23 East Madison, Chicago, IL, 60602
Loop

Opening reception February 9th, 5:30-8:30PM
Closes March 10th

Starting with our next show Quad Core opening on Thursday February 9th, 2012, we will be producing exhibitions and events from our new location in the Loop. We’re working with the Chicago Loop Alliance through the Pop Up Art Program to host exhibitions at the new space through 2012. We have invited Book Club organized by Kimberly Kim to collaborate with What It Is at our new location. Book Club features artist books, zines and other multiples. Contextual texts, art books, critical writing and other works will be available. Kimberly Kim recently had a hippie revelation that everything is connected and influences each other while studying for her Quantum Mechanics exam. Kim makes artist books, photography and video installations. She was raised in South Korea, currently lives and studies in Chicago.

 

-Friday February, 10th-

APOCALYPSE IN THE PLEASURE GARDENS

New Capital
3114 W. Carroll St. 60612
Garfield Park

Opening reception February 10th, 8-11PM

A performance by MIKEY McPARLANE. When Anger inaugurated the pleasure dome, he not only gave the viewer access to an inner world, but also permission and inspiration to describe one’s own figures, landscapes, and seductions. Although paths to the pleasure gardens are well-worn, their origins remain diverse. Is it possible for an artist to re-perform recent histories without mimicking them, and is there any difference?

REASONS TO CUT INTO THE EARTH

Johalla Projects
1821 west Hubbard suite 110
Bucktown

Opening reception February 10th, 7-10PM

Work by Heidi Norton.

REASONS TO CUT INTO THE EARTH

1. An archaeological dig: a prevalent way to recover human history is through archaeological excavation. Archaeology is a loose discipline. The methods of unearthing are scientific and restrained, but the things you look for when digging like an archaeologist are numerous and sometimes completely unknown.

2. To see what’s growing underneath: She dug holes into the earth all summer, her hair tied up in a bandana. She built a studio in the woods, using the holes she dug as molds into which she poured colored wax, capturing flowers, insects, and weeds in the viscous bright liquid. (When big chunks of glaciers get stuck in earth, they create giant pools of ice that result in holes when they melt. Geologists call these holes kettles, and lakes often form in these depressions.) When she was a young girl in West Virginia, she dug holes to explore the parts of the world that were just barely invisible but still attainable to her. The work that she did digging those holes was unprofessionalized and undifferentiated. She could have been looking for fossils or diamonds or evidence of human history before her…

-Saturday February, 11th-

Small-Scale Lifestyles 2

Happy Collaborationist Exhibition Space
1254 N. Noble St.
Noble Square

Opening reception February 11th, 6-10PM

In conjunction with Small-Scale Lifestyles currently on view at Seerveld Gallery, Small-Scale Lifestyles 2 at Happy Collaborationists considers modes of display and the ethics of site-specific works. Special attention is paid to materials located in both the domestic and the institutional that mimic and suggest things other than themselves, highlighting in the instance of the show the mutation that occur in the process of translation of designated material of wealth to an economical, democratic copy of the former.

 

Monster Movie Seminar

Hinge Gallery
1955 W. Chicago Avenue Chicago, IL 60622
Ukranian Village

Opening reception February 11th, 8-10PM

Aaron Delehanty originally conceived of the Monster Movie Seminar with monster movie expert, Matt Fagan during a residency at Lill Street Art Center in 2008. The evening is a celebration of monster movies through performance, discussion, movie clips, and presentation. The festivities will begin at 8 pm with brief performances by Stephanie Burke, Jeriah, and Aaron Delehanty. These performances will be followed by a Monster Movie Presentation. Audience participation in encouraged.

 

Andrew Falkowski Brett Cody Rogers

Manifest Exhibitions
2950 N. Allen Ave | Chicago, IL 60618
Irving Park

Opening reception February 11th, 7-10PM

Andrew Falkowski lives and teaches in the Chicago area. Recently Andrew has had solo exhibitions at Andrew Rafacz Gallery in Chicago and Rosamund Felsen Gallery in Santa Monica, CA. Group shows include Monya Rowe Gallery (NYC), Andrew Rafacz Gallery and HungryMan Gallery (Chicago), and the Suburban (Oak Park, IL). Brett Cody Rogers received his MFA from California Institute of the Arts and is currently working in Los Angeles. Brett has had solo shows at Pepin Moore (Los Angeles), Praz-Delavallade (Berlin), The Approach (London), and David Kordansky (Los Angeles). Recent group shows at Country Club (Los Angeles), Green Gallery (Milwaukee), and Praz-Delavallade (Paris).

-Sunday February, 12th-

Stitchy!

Roxaboxen Exhibitions
2130 W. 21st St.
Pilsen

Opening reception February 12th, 7-10PM

Special Guests: Emily Green and Tara Hill Stitchy is a sewing party for people of all skill levels! Sewing, knitting, crocheting, whatever you do or want to do, you can do it at Stitchy! Bring a project to work on (new or in-progress). We’ll have a few machines, but we always enco…urage people to bring extras if they can. We have snacks too!

BETA EYES: new works by JAMES GREEN

ACRE Projects
1913 W 17th St Chicago, IL 60608
Ukranian Village

Opening reception February 12th, 4-8PM
Closes February 13th

“Shit People Say” is a Youtube phenomenon, with millions of views around the world. It started with “Shit Girls Say,” in which a comedian compiled small clips of himself in drag performing stereotypes of women in various situations, portrayed as technophobic, needy, and self-absorbed. With the power of the internet, new versions of “Shit Girls Say” appeared with various cultural commentaries like: “Shit Black Girls Say,” “Shit White Girls say to Indian Girls,” and “Shit Straight Guys say to Lesbian Women.” Green considers whether these videos are a portal into a new era, where people can freely poke fun at our and others’ cultures, or merely a new conversation where disrespect is celebrated.