0

Artists You Should Know: Pamela Fraser’s Picks

Part of “Best of Chicago Art Magazine,” originally posted February 8, 2011.

Yolanda Green

The best way to find out who’s making a good impression in the art community is to look towards the artists themselves. I asked painter and assistant professor of art and design at UIC Pamela Fraser about some of the artists she likes and who we might need to pay attention to. Here are just a few names that she came up with.

Adam Grossi, Growing Up So Fast

Adam Grossi, Growing Up So Fast

Adam Grossi

Working with color and light to emphasize compelling imagery, Adam Grossi aims to tackle the art that lies behind the middle-class lifestyle. His artistic inspiration stems from many factors. “He hails from Reston, Virginia,” his website describes, “one of the country’s first suburban environments to manifest from the utopian spirit of ‘new town’ development. The triumphs and failures of Reston’s intentional landscape have formed a kind of locus for his creative practice.”

Nicole Northway, Escape Route

Nicole Northway, Escape Route

Nicole Northway

Nicole Northway’s abstract paintings are electrifying and full of life. She has been painting for about ten years now. Currently, she teaches ChiArts at Columbia College and because of this, she seems to have a deep appreciation for the process of making art. She currently has a very active studio blog which chronicles her creative efforts. View more of her work at http://nicolenorthwaystudio.blogspot.com/.

 

Raychael Stine, Food for the Moon

Raychael Stine, Food for the Moon

Raychael Stine
With stunning realism, Stine is able to create rich paintings of oil and acrylic. The subjects of her paintings, for the most part, consist of dogs or other animals. Her portraits often produce a calm tone, showcasing very earthy and pastel colors. Check out her paintings at http://raychaelstine.com/

Molly Zuckerman-Hartung, 20Ten: Stupidity & Speed

Molly Zuckerman-Hartung, 20Ten: Stupidity & Speed

Molly Zuckerman-Hartung

“I like the anachronistic spirit of Molly Zuckerman-Hartung’s work,” Fraser states. And she’s not the only one. Zuckerman-Hartung’s abstract works are a definite favorite among local painters in Chicago. With expressive colors and shapes, she exudes emotion within her work without words, defined imagery, or a narrative. She carefully experiments with texture and placement, sometimes creating very purposeful, interesting, provoking, and sometimes chaotic, scenes on the canvas.

Deb Sokolow, Dear Trusted Associate

Deb Sokolow, Dear Trusted Associate



Deb Sokolow

Fraser admires the “humor and intelligence” of Deb Sokolow’s drawings. Sokolow just recently wrapped up a showing at Western Exhibitions, showcasing a “long-term project of writing dozens of chapters, in no particular order, for a book that will never fully exist…Each page, when finished, represents an entire visual record of the process that takes place when writing each chapter.” The drawings collectively speak to a wide range of topics, from political and social, to seemingly silly ‘everyday’ matters. All of the chapters are connected with a narrative and commentary. You can see work from this exhibition at http://debsokolow.com/.

Selina Trepp, Under the Rainbow

Selina Trepp, Under the Rainbow

Selina Trepp

Selina Trepp is an artist who excels in a many different mediums. She has done works in installation, sculpture, drawing, video, audio, and performance. With her work, narratives are created through various methods, sounds and images. “My artworks are experiments,” Trepp says in her artistic statement. “They are investigations with outcomes that are defined by process. Rather than documenting or representing the real world, I reflect on it by moving sideways from it, constructing a parallel reality, a reality that mixes the familiar with the uncanny, real and unreal at once.”

Fraser explains that Trepp is starting produce work in painting as well, possibly gaining inspiration from her grandmother, who is also a painter. Fraser is very interested in her approach to painting, given her free and experimental style. More of Trepp’s work can be found at http://selinatrepp.info/home.html